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  #1  
Old 05-03-2006, 03:49 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 2
Default 94 Transmission Issue

This has been happening for a long time now, and I finally want to fix it.

I drive the car in the monring and its fine... and then about 1/2 hour after its been driven, the transmission won't go past 1st or second gear. I have to restart the car and then it starts working again for a couple minutes, then it does it again. I've heard siimilar problems from other concorde owners, but I havent heard a sure cause. any suggestions? thanks so much, I appreciate it

Tricia
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  #2  
Old 05-16-2006, 01:39 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4
Default RE: 94 Transmission Issue

As someone who has had a 1994 LHS (I know have a 1996 LHS) your problem is well known. It actually has to do with tempreture. The cold will do it. It actually sticks in 2nd gear, and yes you have to shut the car off to reset it. You can try a new tranny computer but it may not solve the problem, in fact I was never able to fix the issue in my car.

I had a chance to get a 1994 LHS with 30k miles on it but I skipped on it because of this very issue.
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  #3  
Old 05-16-2006, 06:04 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 2
Default RE: 94 Transmission Issue

you know, its funny; i've heard some people say it happens in cold, but in my experience, it never happens in cold and always happens when its hot!
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  #4  
Old 07-25-2006, 12:58 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 4
Default RE: 94 Transmission Issue

History

The Ultradrive was a significant technological advancement in transmission operation, as it was one of the first electronically-controlled automatics. It pioneered many now-common features, such as adaptive shifting: the computer would optimize shifting based on the driving style of the operator. Unfortunately it earned a reputation for being unreliable, especially in Chrysler's minivans, which had high failure rates. A misprint in both owner's manuals and transmission fluid dipsticks in early models advocated the use of Dexron II transmission fluid in the event the required fluid (Type 7176, also known as ATF+3) was not available. Dexron does not provide the necessary fluid properties for proper operation of the transmission, often resulting in malfunction (commonly deferring the computer into the notorious "limp-home" mode, under which the transmission will not shift beyond second gear) or complete failure of the unit. As a result, the older hydraulically-controlled 3-speed automatic was later made available on vehicles equipped with Mitsubishi's 6G72 V6 engine, which was usually paired with the Ultradrive during its first few years.

On paper, the A604 was a great innovation. When working correctly, it will shift smoothly and perfectly, thus providing a soft, comfortable ride often associated with high-end luxury cars. The transmission, being so electronic, also lacks bands to adjust.

The torque converter measured 9.5 inches in diameter and was mounted to the flywheel by a flexible drive plate. The transaxle was cooled through an oil-to-water heat exchanger in the collector tank on the radiator, and/or a standard oil-to-air heat exchanger.

The Ultradrive has evolved dramatically over its long years of production. Countless changes, both electrical and mechanical have been made in an attempt to improve the reliability of the A604. Such changes include different valve bodies, solenoid packs, sensors, etc. One of the better improvements was the introduction of a flash-programmable TCM, which monitors the operator's driving habits, and sets up a custom shifting pattern for the driver.

The A604/41TE transmission also uses 20 fewer parts than its 3-speed siblings.

Mitsubishi's Sportronic transmission was a modified version of the 41TE.
[edit]

Technical information

There are 4 different types of units. The differences between the types are the bell housing bolt pattern and valve body assemblies. The first type was used for the 2.5 L engine, second type for the 6G72 V6, third type for the 3.3 L and 3.8 L V6s and the fourth type for the 2.0 L and 2.4 L engines.
[edit]

A604 to 41TE

The most common problems with early A604 transmissions are poor shifting quality and sudden locks into second gear ("limp-home" mode), even during highway driving. Between January 1989 and July 1991, Chrysler tried 28 different changes to deal with A604 problems according to Chrysler's reference guide, "History of the A-604 Transaxle." Nine design changes were made in an attempt to fix clutch failure, and four were directed to "shift busyness", or excessive shifting on hills.

Between January 1989 and July 1991, Chrysler tried 28 different changes to deal with Ultradrive problems. In 1991, after much pressure from the Center for Auto Safety, Consumer Reports and others, Chrysler promised to waive the $100 deductable in the warranty, provide loaners, and buy back any cars with Ultradrives that could not be fixed. Chrysler ran an unprecedented campaign to contact all owners of cars with Ultradrives to find and fix problems.

In 1992, Chrysler renamed the A604 as the 41TE transmission. Technical service bulletins after this date refer to the A604 as the 41TE even though the bulletin might cover 1989 models, when the Ultradrive was known only as the A604.
[edit]

A604/41TE

Applications:

* 1989-1993 Chrysler New Yorker
* 1989-1995 Chrysler LeBaron
* 1989-2007 Dodge Caravan
* 1989-1993 Dodge Daytona
* 1989-1993 Dodge Dynasty
* 1989-1994 Dodge Shadow
* 1989-1994 Dodge Spirit
* 1989-1994 Plymouth Acclaim
* 1989-2000 Plymouth Voyager
* 1990-1993 Chrysler Imperial
* 1990-1993 Chrysler New Yorker Fifth Avenue
* 1990-2007 Chrysler Town and Country
* 1992-1994 Plymouth Duster
* 1995-2000 Chrysler Cirrus
* 1995-2006 Chrysler Sebring
* 1995-2000 Dodge Avenger
* 1995-2006 Dodge Stratus
* 1996-2000 Plymouth Breeze
* 2000-2003 Chrysler Voyager
* 2001-present Chrysler PT Cruiser
* 2002-2005 Dodge Neon

[edit]

41AE

The 41AE was a variant of the 41TE used for all-wheel drive variants of the minivans.

Applications:

* 1991-2004 Chrysler Town and Country
* 1991-2004 Dodge Caravan
* 1991-2000 Plymouth Voyager
* 2000-2003 Chrysler Voyager

[edit]

42LE

The 42LE was an upgraded version of the 41TE modified for longitudinal engines. It debuted in 1993 on the LH cars. It is strengthened with a reworked final drive unit, barreled axle shafts, and upgraded clutch packs.

The 42LE was modified in 2002 as the 42RLE, originally for the then-new Jeep Liberty. This transmission will reportedly remain in production through the end of the decade with the LX cars and the 2007 Jeep Wrangler.

Applications:

* 42LE
o 1999-2004 Chrysler 300M
o 1993-2004 Chrysler Concorde
o 1994-2001 Chrysler LHS
o 1994-1996 Chrysler New Yorker
o 1993-2004 Dodge Intrepid
o 1993-1997 Eagle Vision
o 1997-2001 Plymouth Prowler
o 2001-2002 Chrysler Prowler
* 42RLE
o 2005-present Chrysler 300
o 2007-present Chrysler Aspen
o 2006-present Dodge Charger
o 2005-present Dodge Dakota
o 2004-present Dodge Durango
o 2005-present Dodge Magnum
o 2007-present Dodge Nitro
o 2002-present Jeep Liberty
o 2003-present Jeep Wrangler

[edit]

40TES/41TES

The 40TES and 41TES are upgraded versions of the 41TE first introduced with the 2007 Chrysler Sebring. The 40TES is used with the 2.4 L GEMA I4 engine while the 41TES is used with the 2.7 L EER V6.

Applications:

* 2007-present Chrysler Sebring
* 2008-present Dodge Avenger

[edit]

62TE

The 62TE is a six-speed derivative of the 41TE first introduced with the 2007 Chrysler Sebring, and used on the 3.5 L EGJ V6.

Applications:

* 2007-present Chrysler Sebring
* 2008-present Dodge Avenger
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  #5  
Old 09-23-2006, 09:33 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1
Default RE: 94 Transmission Issue

obviously ive wasted money&time as you have. fluids checked filter changed researched and still no answers. not realy here for a history lesson just wana drive it (NECESSITY).have donor trans but no means to swapout getting frustratedand need to vent.a walkthrough would be apretiated.should have bought a jeep insted of my LHS PO$
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2007, 06:05 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1
Default RE: 94 Transmission Issue

I belive I am having a similar problem. I own a 94 Eagle Vision. The tranny will go into drive, but NOT reverse. When in drive, it will not shift up to 2nd, and the engine will just sit and rev, mocking me.

so its the TCM? Its been well below freezing here in ohio for the last couple weeks, so it could be the problem.

Ive been quoted 1200 to 1400 for a rebuild. Is this a good price?

replaced the fluid, filter, and 2 sensors

driving me nuts, my bf is carting me around, and i'm getting sick of it.
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  #7  
Old 06-09-2008, 09:55 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1
Default RE: 94 Transmission Issue

Had a problem with the transmission not shifting well, not going into 1st, harsh shifting, not going into drive and various dash problems. A mechanic noted that for the LHS low and/or dirty transmission can cause these problems. Not only will the shifting be a problem, but the sensor output can cause the computer to get downright squirly.

Atransmission flush with an additive to improve performance, followeed by disconnecting the battery for 1/2 an hour,fixed the problems. The transmission shifts as good as new. The dash behaves well.
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  #8  
Old 04-07-2009, 11:46 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 4
Default summing it up

Here's a summary of the related issues...

1. The input speed senser must match the output speed sensor in voltage otherwise this would tell the computer that the clutch is slipping and go into limp mode. Best fix is replace or clean sensors or wiring to sensors. Clean sensors when changing fluids.

2. When changing fluids system must be flushed also to get out all of the fluid, a filter change will only change out half of the transmission fluids.

3. In the wiring to the tranmission computer there is a spot where the computer connects to the engine computer and the body computer, this spot causes problems when it corrodes. It should be cut and respliced to ensure a secure connection. Also make sure you battery neg wire is large enough otherwise it will not be providing enough ground to the transmission, engine, starter. Also, the alternator ground should also be tied to the body of the engine.

4. Your transmission is still good and doesn't need a rebuild. There have been several people add this bit of knowledge. If you take your transmission to a transmission guy you will be paying for a rebuild and sometimes this fails to solve the problem with the transmission in the first place. Some good pointers to remember before deciding on a rebuild is, one...that the output speed sensor is magnetized so that if you pull the speed the sensor and there is no or little metal chavings on it then you aren't burning up the gears in your transmission. This would be the only reason you would need a rebuilt, to replace gears. Other than that if you have fluid leaks out of the pump (convertor area) or cv joint bushings. Then it would be a bench rebuild, not a complete rebuild, and the master rebuild kit for this is $130.
(know if you clutch is good or not) this can be done by having the transmsision computer read for the clutch index, you don't have a problem till that number climbs up to 100 and over. You can't burn out you clutch in one day. Just like a manual clutch it takes weeks to burn that baby up. And it is a progressive thing. You will notice it slipping more and more week after week. You would do yourself a favor not to take it to the shop as soon as it starts slipping till you know if it is the clutch or not. The only way to fix clutches is a rebuild. But anything causes clutch slipping, not just worn clutches. (bad or dirty input and output speed sensors, dirty transmission fluid, bad electrical connects to and from tranmission, even problems with temp sensor on engine because the tranmission computer uses these sensors to determine how and when to engage the clutches!)

5. Last but not least the transmission computer should be reset after a transmission swap because of the clutch index, also may need reset after any tranmission failure including a transmission oil change becuase the slipping characteristics of the clutches changes. But there is no way to reset it without a transmission computer reader, I think on the newer cars use can use a obdII scanner which is only $30.

6. atf oil adds lubrication, so this is the advantage it adds to the a604

Last edited by microedit; 04-07-2009 at 11:52 AM.
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  #9  
Old 03-16-2011, 12:00 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by microedit View Post
Here's a summary of the related issues...

1. The input speed senser must match the output speed sensor in voltage otherwise this would tell the computer that the clutch is slipping and go into limp mode. Best fix is replace or clean sensors or wiring to sensors. Clean sensors when changing fluids.

2. When changing fluids system must be flushed also to get out all of the fluid, a filter change will only change out half of the transmission fluids.

3. In the wiring to the tranmission computer there is a spot where the computer connects to the engine computer and the body computer, this spot causes problems when it corrodes. It should be cut and respliced to ensure a secure connection. Also make sure you battery neg wire is large enough otherwise it will not be providing enough ground to the transmission, engine, starter. Also, the alternator ground should also be tied to the body of the engine.

4. Your transmission is still good and doesn't need a rebuild. There have been several people add this bit of knowledge. If you take your transmission to a transmission guy you will be paying for a rebuild and sometimes this fails to solve the problem with the transmission in the first place. Some good pointers to remember before deciding on a rebuild is, one...that the output speed sensor is magnetized so that if you pull the speed the sensor and there is no or little metal chavings on it then you aren't burning up the gears in your transmission. This would be the only reason you would need a rebuilt, to replace gears. Other than that if you have fluid leaks out of the pump (convertor area) or cv joint bushings. Then it would be a bench rebuild, not a complete rebuild, and the master rebuild kit for this is $130.
(know if you clutch is good or not) this can be done by having the transmsision computer read for the clutch index, you don't have a problem till that number climbs up to 100 and over. You can't burn out you clutch in one day. Just like a manual clutch it takes weeks to burn that baby up. And it is a progressive thing. You will notice it slipping more and more week after week. You would do yourself a favor not to take it to the shop as soon as it starts slipping till you know if it is the clutch or not. The only way to fix clutches is a rebuild. But anything causes clutch slipping, not just worn clutches. (bad or dirty input and output speed sensors, dirty transmission fluid, bad electrical connects to and from tranmission, even problems with temp sensor on engine because the tranmission computer uses these sensors to determine how and when to engage the clutches!)

5. Last but not least the transmission computer should be reset after a transmission swap because of the clutch index, also may need reset after any tranmission failure including a transmission oil change becuase the slipping characteristics of the clutches changes. But there is no way to reset it without a transmission computer reader, I think on the newer cars use can use a obdII scanner which is only $30.

6. atf oil adds lubrication, so this is the advantage it adds to the a604
Thanks!
The BIG - REALLY BIG- question is:

Where do we FIND someone who can - and will -
read the TCM (1994 Grand Voyager)
and give us a COMPLETE diagnosis ???

(And I'm in north central West Virginia.)
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  #10  
Old 01-18-2012, 06:36 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1
Default 94 chrysler new yorker same problem

So I just bought my new yorker and the same problem has been happening to me. I live in a small town but thank god we have a transmission specialist. He plugged it up to the computer for free and this is what he got. Code 42 2-4 solenoid circuit failure. He said if it's not the solenoid itself it's a wiring problem . New solenoid with installation he said is 600 dollars. The latter would be cheaper. obviously I've been doing some research on the wiring . It's the white 1 with dark blue stripes. I hope this helps
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Old 01-18-2012, 06:36 AM
 
 
 
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Tags
1994, 1995, 300m, a604, bolt, change, chrysler, codes, exchanger, fluid, heat, lebaron, pattern, scan, transmission, v6, yorker

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