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P0140 - O2 Sensor

  #1  
Old 03-03-2009, 06:18 AM
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Default P0140 - O2 Sensor

I've got a question. Several weeks ago, my check engine light came on. It freaked me out, but so far, I haven't really noticed anything out of the ordinary. I did the start-up thing to get the output codes and I got P0140. From what I've read, I know that it has something to do with an O2 Sensor. Can anyone tell me what exactly this does? Also, I'm a poor college student, so I really prefer not to spend money unless absolutely necessary. Is this something that needs to be fixed soon? Thanks.

Edit: Also, if it's important, I drive a 2002 Chrysler Sebring LXI 2.7L.
 
  #2  
Old 03-03-2009, 02:22 PM
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Driving the car with the check engine light on for an extended period is not a good idea. That code is telling you that the computer is not getting a proper signal from the downstream O2 sensor on the rear bank of cylinders. So what does that mean? It may mean that the O2 sensor is in need of replacement. It may mean that the catalytic converter on that side is going bad. Either way, when the computer generates that code it doesn't trust the readings it gets from the sensor and operates the engine by "educated guess" rather than by what is actually happening in the combustion cycle. The result is that you will be getting worse gas mileage and worse performance than the engine is capable of, and this may lead to further deterioration of the catalytic converters and more pollution from the engine. Long story made short, fixing sooner is cheaper than letting it go.
On the other hand, O2 sensors are not terribly expensive, and if you are reasonably handy with tools, you can probably replace it yourself. You will need the correct wrench to remove and install the sensor. There are four sensors on your car. You are looking to replace the one downstream of the catalytic converter for the rear bank of cylinders.
If you decide to do this yourself, the check engine light probably won't go off right away. It requires a certain number of "good trips" to clear the code. A "good trip" consists of a cold start and warm up without encountering a fault, so the code will clear after a few days if that solved the problem.
Here's a plan for a college student on a limited budget: Go over to your local auto parts store and ask them if they will read your car for codes. See what comes up on their code reader. If they agree that it's an O2 sensor, find out the price and if they have a tool loaner program. (Autozone does this, I think). You may be able to get under the car and do this by parking over a depression in the ground. DON'T get under a car supported only by a jack. That's a good way to get killed.
Alternatively, there's always a loan from the Bank of Dad.
 
  #3  
Old 03-03-2009, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by dcotter0579 View Post
Driving the car with the check engine light on for an extended period is not a good idea. That code is telling you that the computer is not getting a proper signal from the downstream O2 sensor on the rear bank of cylinders. So what does that mean? It may mean that the O2 sensor is in need of replacement. It may mean that the catalytic converter on that side is going bad. Either way, when the computer generates that code it doesn't trust the readings it gets from the sensor and operates the engine by "educated guess" rather than by what is actually happening in the combustion cycle. The result is that you will be getting worse gas mileage and worse performance than the engine is capable of, and this may lead to further deterioration of the catalytic converters and more pollution from the engine. Long story made short, fixing sooner is cheaper than letting it go.
On the other hand, O2 sensors are not terribly expensive, and if you are reasonably handy with tools, you can probably replace it yourself. You will need the correct wrench to remove and install the sensor. There are four sensors on your car. You are looking to replace the one downstream of the catalytic converter for the rear bank of cylinders.
If you decide to do this yourself, the check engine light probably won't go off right away. It requires a certain number of "good trips" to clear the code. A "good trip" consists of a cold start and warm up without encountering a fault, so the code will clear after a few days if that solved the problem.
Here's a plan for a college student on a limited budget: Go over to your local auto parts store and ask them if they will read your car for codes. See what comes up on their code reader. If they agree that it's an O2 sensor, find out the price and if they have a tool loaner program. (Autozone does this, I think). You may be able to get under the car and do this by parking over a depression in the ground. DON'T get under a car supported only by a jack. That's a good way to get killed.
Alternatively, there's always a loan from the Bank of Dad.
Thanks for your help.

Well, I don't know anything about cars, so I'd most likely have to take it in to get it fixed. Any ballpark figure of what that's going to cost to replace the sensor?
 
  #4  
Old 03-04-2009, 03:06 PM
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Should be less than a hundred bucks I would think. With the car up on a hoist, it's not a big deal for a guy who knows what he's doing. The shop will want to slap a code reader on there to verify that that is, in fact, the problem and that there is nothing else going on. Hopefully that will take care of the problem. The shop will turn off the light for you, too.
Let us know how it turns out.
 
  #5  
Old 03-04-2009, 11:55 PM
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Thanks man. I won't have the money for a week or two, so I guess I'm just going to drive it minimally and hope nothing goes wrong.
 
  #6  
Old 11-23-2013, 01:58 PM
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Hi guys, I'm new to your forum but have been reading for a longer time in here already. I just want to introduce myself quite shortly for community reasons:

I live in Germany, me and my girl both drive Sebrings with passion; both cars are 2001 Limited with the 2.7 engine. We are Sebring enthusiasts; I once had one of them bought new and rode it from 2002 till 2006 and always thought that one day when I'm not bound to the Mercedes-Chrysler Company any longer in situations of repair policies I would want to have this car again... During the years between 2006 and last year I got stuck with a 1994 Pontiac Transsport; last year it was time to face that the Transsport days are over...

So I fell back to my former dream car. :-)

Last year both my girl and I bought used 2001 Sebrings in good condition, and with the options of today I see this can become a wonderful relationship between us and the cars... ;-)

I certainly have learned during the time with the Pontiac that nothing is so important than having the original garage manual for the car you own (and maintain with pleasure) and so I am happy to announce that I have the "big book of secrets" for our beloved Sebrings already...

I hope my short introduction didn't leave an impact of annoyance to you readers. What I hope I can stand for is to be a vivid reader of your postings, and maybe help out sometimes.

My name is Peter.

--

OK; here we go; let's see if this topic is still something to be discussed.

I usually take my first information on error codes from a website called "obd-codes.com", a wide pool on information in case you like reading and taking a peep over the edge of your cradle.

When P0140 occurred first time a couple of months ago on my Sebring at a mileage of about 65,000 miles all of a sudden on the highway at a permanent speed of 80miles/h I though... "Ooops"; it was the first time I saw any error code on my engine-soon indicator. --A week later the same code occurred on the display of my girl's Sebring at about 80,000 of mileage, while it never happened on mine again after I had erased the codes in my ECM and refilled the tank.

To be noticed: Even though both cars are about the same age and mileage; mine was built in 05-2001; hers in 09-2001. --We both have different work way profiles; I usually go about 50 miles daily thru suburbs and city streets while she drives 80 miles a day at a mix of 80% highways and 20% of comparable streets like I use. My car is American built while her Sebring is of Austrian origin. Many tiny differences I have noticed so far (i.e. the manufacturing is better at the Austrian while the durability of parts seem to be better at the American). The engines even do sound differently, the American seems to have more power at full throttle (1mile/h faster... lol) even though the Austrian engine runs smoother. But if you try to find differences all you find is that i.e. the starter motor is from different origins.

Back to P0140: I read that sometimes gasoline quality can trigger P0140. So I reviewed our refilling behavior. It occurred to me that we usually both go to the gas station at the same time, and I fill up both cars, then. The difference is, that my girl's car tank is usually almost empty, while my car needs an additional fill-up of about 3 to 4 gallons. ...When P0140 occurred once on my car, the tank had been almost empty for about 2 or 3 periods of being refilled while my girl's car had faced about 20 intervals of being almost empty to the bottom in a row.

The solution: After I read about the several reasons for P0140 on the internet I bought an additive that cleans the fuel system. It has been advised that first before you change the o2 sensors you make sure your fueling is cleaned. The additive came in little bottles which you add to the almost empty tank, let the engine run for 10 minutes and refill the tank.

My car was fine with it and P0140 never occurred anymore, while my girl's car started showing P0140 frequently again. So I did the same procedure again, and after 3 more times of refueling Mr. P0140 was gone.

The side effect is that her Sebring uses a bit less gas after this procedure. The additive was about 7$ at each treatment, and I've learned that you maybe shouldn't drive a 12 year old car always to the bottom of the gas tank.

Either way; maybe it makes sense to exchange the o2 sensor on the back-end, or you clean-up your system: Both is in need of observation from a certain point of age. If you keep maintaining your Sebring it'll be your smooth companion anytime.

Take care
P
 
  #7  
Old 12-17-2013, 04:43 PM
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Recall: After a few weeks my girl was driving my car, again. She came back having P0140 again on the display. I didn't have it for weeks. But I wasn't speeding up to more than 70 miles all that time. The car consumes the same amount of gas than before.

As it seems it comes at higher velocities. If you are a decent driver you may not even take notice of it.

Now I do think it has something to do with the way how you drive your car. I usually do no kick-downs since I usually get stuck in traffic jam all mornings but my partner has free highway times any morning where she can easily speed up (up to about 90m/h.) Both mine and her Sebring produce P0140, then, after a while of driving without any extra acceleration on the Autobahn.

I am clueless. Regular driving with short kick-downs let both cars run ok w/o error codes; both engines have perfect behavior; you can even kick them both to the limit at about 140 m/h without noticing a misbehavior on German Autobahns for hours... I have in mind to exchange the brand of the motor oil since consumption of oil seems to be high (up to 1/2 gal between two oil changes), but if you let the engine run on 3k rpm for a while (which is 120km/m or about 70m/h) sometime the engine soon lamp blinks up and we have P0140 on the roll.

I`ll update this issue after I have done the next oil change.

LGP
 

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