Chrysler Aspen This new SUV adds a luxury touch to the performance and quality that you would expect from a Chrysler Corp. SUV.

Aspen "Tonnage" rating?

  #1  
Old 11-06-2017, 04:47 AM
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Default Aspen "Tonnage" rating?

I know that my 08' 5.7L 4x4 is suppose to have a trailer towing capacity of 8700 (14,000 GCVW). This weekend I was checking on prices for renting a steer skid "bobcat" to do some work around the house. The salesman said that I needed either a 1/2 ton truck for one of the units or a 3/4 ton truck for the other one. This got me to wondering. What does the Aspen classify as in a tonnage rating.

Some quick searches online revealed some interesting numbers. Some of which I find hard to believe. One website said that a 1/2 ton pickup (F-150, Ram 2500, Chevy 2500) is not suppose to exceed 5000 lbs. With that logic, a 1/4 ton would be 2500 lbs and a 3/4 would be 7500 lbs. However, I know this can't be right as I know a 3/4 truck can pull in excess of 10 K. This would also mean that the Aspen is a 3/4 ton which also leaves me wondering.

So does anyone know what or how to figure out what the Aspen classifies as in tonnage?
 
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Old 11-22-2017, 06:45 AM
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I am not an expert but the "rating" vary depending on options. A 1/2 ton pickup can vary between 5000-10,000 lbs towing and the 3/4 is a step up from there. They having towing options just like the Aspen. The 08 Ram is rated 200-300 lbs less than the Aspen due to GVW, so looks can be deceiving. Go by your vehicles specs. I know there is a Mercedes SUV that tows as much as our Aspens, but most people look at it and think "station wagon".
 
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Old 11-25-2017, 11:09 AM
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I am aware that options vary towing capacity just like any other vehicle. I am also aware of the specs of my vehicle. However, it's only mentioned in pounds (8700 towing) etc. When I went to check on renting the steer skid, they said I needed a 1/2 or 3/4 ton truck. Not a vehicle that could pull 5000 lbs or whatever. So what I am trying to figure out is where the Aspen would fall in this area (if it does). 1/4 ton truck, 1/2 ton or even 3/4.
 
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:40 AM
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Sorry, what I was trying to say is the 1/2 and 3/4 ton name does not mean much anymore. It relates to how much the truck would carry, not tow. With all the advances a F150( the current 1/2 ton )can carry 1500-2000lb. So I guess ours at 1600 lbs would be equivalent to a current 1/2 ton pickup.
 
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:40 AM
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Thank you. That's what I was wondering. I was thinking the Aspen would at least be a 1/2 ton. Thanks for the clarification.
 
  #6  
Old 11-25-2018, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by calamity coyote View Post
Thank you. That's what I was wondering. I was thinking the Aspen would at least be a 1/2 ton. Thanks for the clarification.
Did you ended up towing the skid steer with your Aspen? I only ask because I plan on towing up to 8k with mines and wonder how it will do.

I do know while most "1/2" suv's are rated to tow as much as a 1/2 pick up with similar drivetrain but the main limiting factor in trailer towing is in the cargo capacity of the tow vehicle (GVWR-empty weight=cargo capacity). The tongue weight of the trailer is the weight that the vehicle will carry and some trailers such as RV's have heavy tongue weights for the load while others like boats might be lighter. Suv to be heavier than comparable pick up because of extra sheet metal, interior, accessories so that takes away from the cargo capacity.

An example could be that one trailer weighing 8,000 might can have a tongue weight of 800 pounds (10%) while another 8,000 trailer might have a tongue weight of 1200 pounds (15%). If your suv has a cargo capacity of lets say 1800 pounds the second trailer will take up a lot of that and add in fuel and passengers it is easier to overload a 1/2 suv before hitting the trailer tow rating. What the 3/4 ton and 1 ton gain with their stronger suspension is cargo carrying capacity on top of trailer tow rating. Many of the 1/2 ton HD and 3/4 ton can carry over 3K of cargo so a much heavier tongue weight they can tow.

The question in your scenario is how much will the tongue weight be? You can control that by how far forward or back you secure the skid steer to the trailer. Most people recommend at least 10% of tongue weight from total trailer weight for stability. Anything less than that and the trailer can be twitchy on highway and prone to sway. The heavier you load the tongue the trailer becomes more stable up to 25% which is the standard for 5th wheel and gooseneck hitches which tow much more solid than bumper pull trailers..
 
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:44 PM
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No, I never towed the skid steer. Since it is not a "Truck" per their guidelines, they wouldn't even let me hook up to it. Like you, I figured the distribution of weight by location on the trailer would work, but they require a 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton truck.
 
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