Chrysler Voyager & Town & Country The first and foremost name in minivans leading the class since their inception in the 1980s

Brake issue ..

  #1  
Old 10-21-2012, 10:53 AM
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Default Brake issue ..

I am changing pads and rotors on a 2010 Town and country. First i found out the caliper spins in.. not pressed , after i tried to press it in. Dont think any damage was done here as it still spins in. but i did notice a small cut in the rubber around the caliper. Can i change just the rubber? or do i have to change the whole thing. If i can change just the rubber do i just spin it all the way out? Is there anything special in bleeding the brakes i should know?
Thanks
Glen
 
  #2  
Old 10-22-2012, 02:17 PM
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Location: Auburn Hills, MI
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I'm not sure about the rubber piece being sold seperately or only as an assembly.

Here are the instructions via the service manual:

MANUAL BLEEDING PROCEDURE

NOTE: To bleed the brakes manually, the aid of a helper will be required.

1. Attach a clear plastic hose to the bleeder screw and feed the hose into a clear jar containing enough fresh brake fluid to submerge the end of the hose.
2. Have a helper pump the brake pedal three or four times and hold it in the down position.
3. With the pedal in the down position, open the bleeder screw at least one full turn.
4. Once the brake pedal has dropped, close the bleeder screw. After the bleeder screw is closed, release the brake pedal.
5. Repeat the above steps until all trapped air is removed from that wheel circuit (usually four or five times).
6. Bleed the remaining wheel circuits in the same manner until all air is removed from the brake system. Monitor the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir to make sure it does not go dry.
7. Check and adjust brake fluid level to the FULL mark.
8. Check brake pedal travel and feel. If pedal travel is excessive or if the pedal feels excessively spongy, some air may still be trapped in the system. Re-bleed the brakes as necessary including the IPB Caliper Brake Bleeding Procedure on the rear calipers as listed below.
9. Test drive the vehicle to verify the brakes are operating properly and pedal feel is correct.

IPB CALIPER BRAKE BLEEDING PROCEDURE

Perform the following procedure on each rear brake caliper as necessary.

1. Raise and support vehicle.
2. Remove the wheel mounting nuts, then the tire and wheel assembly.
3. Remove the brake caliper lower guide pin bolt.
4. Swing the caliper assembly upward, pivoting off the upper guide pin, until clear of the adapter bracket.
5. Remove the outboard pad from the adapter bracket.
6. Return the caliper back down over the adapter bracket into mounted position and install the lower guide pin bolt finger tight.
7. Slowly pump the brake pedal until the caliper fingers touch the outboard surface of the brake rotor. Release the pedal.
8. Remove the brake caliper lower guide pin bolt.
9. Swing the caliper assembly upward, pivoting off the upper guide pin, until clear of the adapter bracket.
10. Reinstall the outboard pad in the adapter bracket.
11. Open the caliper bleeder screw at least one full turn.
12. Seat (bottom) the caliper piston in the bore as follows:a. Assemble a 3/8 in. drive ratchet handle and an extension.
b. Insert the extension through Assembly, Forcing Screw 8807-1.
c. Place Adapter 8807-2 on the end of the extension.
d. Insert lugs on Adapter 8807-2 into notches in face of caliper piston.
e. Thread the screw drive on Assembly, Forcing Screw 8807-1 down until it contacts the top of Adapter 8807-2 which is against the caliper piston. Do not over tighten the screw-drive. Damage to the piston can occur.
f. Turn Adapter 8807-2 with the ratchet, rotating the piston in a clockwise direction until fully seated (bottomed) in the bore. It may be necessary to turn Assembly, Forcing Screw 8807-1 with Adapter 8807-2 to start the process of piston retraction.
13. Close the bleeder screw.
14. Return the caliper back down over the adapter bracket into mounted position and install the lower guide pin bolt finger tight.
15. Have a helper pump the brake pedal three or four times and hold it in the down position.
16. With the pedal in the down position, open the bleeder screw at least one full turn and let out fluid and air, if any.
17. Once the brake pedal has dropped, close the bleeder screw. Once the bleeder screw is closed, release the brake pedal.
18. Repeat the previous three steps until all trapped air is removed.
19. Tighten the guide pin bolt to 35 N·m (26 ft. lbs.).
20. Repeat the above procedure on the opposite rear brake caliper as necessary.
21. Check brake pedal travel and feel. If pedal travel is still excessive or if the pedal feels excessively spongy, repeat the entire procedure as necessary.
22. Install the tire and wheel assembly. Install and tighten wheel mounting nuts to 135 N·m (100 ft. lbs.).
23. Lower the vehicle.
24. Test drive the vehicle to verify the brakes are operating properly and pedal feel is correct.

STANDARD PROCEDURE - ANTILOCK BRAKE SYSTEM BLEEDING
The base brake's hydraulic system must be bled anytime air enters the hydraulic system. The ABS must always be bled anytime it is suspected that the HCU has ingested air.

Brake systems with ABS must be bled as two independent braking systems. The non-ABS portion of the brake system with ABS is to be bled the same as any non-ABS system.

The ABS portion of the brake system must be bled separately. Use the following procedure to properly bleed the brake hydraulic system including the ABS.

NOTE: During the brake bleeding procedure, be sure the brake fluid level remains close to the FULL level in the master cylinder fluid reservoir. Check the fluid level periodically during the bleeding procedure and add MoparŪ DOT 3 brake fluid as required.

BLEEDING
When bleeding the ABS system, the following bleeding sequence must be followed to insure complete and adequate bleeding.

1. Make sure all hydraulic fluid lines are installed and properly torqued.
2. Connect the scan tool to the diagnostics connector. The diagnostic connector is located under the lower steering column cover to the left of the steering column.
3. Using the scan tool, check to make sure the ABM does not have any fault codes stored. If it does, clear them.

WARNING: When bleeding the brake system wear safety glasses. A clear bleed tube must be attached to the bleeder screws and submerged in a clear container filled part way with clean brake fluid. Direct the flow of brake fluid away from yourself and the painted surfaces of the vehicle. Brake fluid at high pressure may come out of the bleeder screws when opened.

NOTE: Pressure bleeding is recommended to bleed the base brake system to ensure all air is removed from system. Manual bleeding may also be used, but additional time is needed to remove all air from system.
4. Bleed the base brake system.
5. Using the scan tool, select ECU VIEW, followed by ABS MISCELLANEOUS FUNCTIONS to access bleeding. Follow the instructions displayed. When finished, disconnect the scan tool and proceed.
6. Bleed the base brake system a second time. Check brake fluid level in the reservoir periodically to prevent emptying, causing air to enter the hydraulic system.
7. Fill the master cylinder fluid reservoir to the FULL level.
8. Test drive the vehicle to be sure the brakes are operating correctly and that the brake pedal does not feel spongy.
 
  #3  
Old 11-27-2015, 01:24 PM
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Bad design. Chrysler physicists paid to figure out half life of engineering materials that are fed into stochastic algorithms in order to determine future maintenance revenues on vehicle repair. In other words promising Nordstrom on a 7-11 budget. Forget all the spilled milk discussions here. Get higher grade materials all around - Cross-Drilled and Slotted rotors, Ceramic pads, heavier duty calipers and your nightmare will be over. YOU have to re-engineer the solution. After review of all the "advice" (okay), it will never resolve your problem, which is actually based on figuring out what is going to break next because of "UNPREDICTABLE" results engineering from Chrysler. Correction, what is PREDICTABLE is that this engineering is calculated to fail in the short term. If you don't follow this advice you will constantly be trying to figure out "now what is wrong" with your brakes, besides trying to figure out why did I buy this engineered lemon.
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-2015, 01:39 PM
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Exclamation town and country brakes bad design

I have a 2010 Town and Country. I had new pads all around and new rear calipers (bigger) put on 1 year ago, put under 20k and worn front pads, worn rear calipers, worn front calipers now. Shocks worn as well. This vehicle was designed to nickel and dime you to death. Get upgraded shocks, the ones that come with it are meant to last for only a midterm lifetime, while they place undo wear on the rest of the components (brakes in particular). Plan to keep this orange (BORDER line lemon) because of the payments and economies of scale. So, replacing front and rear shocks and calipers (drilled & slotted) high grade materials, ceramic pads. The rear shocks will have springs. Check the NHTS forum and you will find plenty of reported failures pertaining to Chrysler's engineering (lack of) regarding the braking system on Town and Country vans. EVERYONE I meet at parking lots and gas station ALL have the same answer about their Town and Country or Caravan brakes. The advice you get here will only resolve an issue for a short term, because the entire suspension/brake design from Chrysler is flawed and whatever is not worn or broken will be shortly after you apply the band aide(s) advice. If you do it yourself it will cost about $1000 for all the parts (shocks, brakes, tie rods), then take it to a brake shop to flush out your fluid and get an alignment.
 
  #5  
Old 05-05-2018, 08:03 AM
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Posts: 3
Default Bleeding issues

I have a 2000 grand voyager .went to bleed brakes and only thing that bleed is driver front and passenger rear. I can't get the other opposite side to bleed . Any advice???
 
  #6  
Old 05-05-2018, 12:08 PM
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Location: Detroit suburb
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The master cylinder is divided into two parts. Each part sends fluid to brake pairs on diagonally opposite wheels. It sounds like you have a problem at the master cylinder.
 
  #7  
Old 05-05-2018, 04:59 PM
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Location: Western NY
Posts: 813
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Not knowing why you are trying to bleed the brakes, could it be you had a low pedal and lack of fluid? At 18 yrs of age, could have a leaking rusted brake line to the corners that you can't get to bleed out. At least a STATE of location would help in suggestions relating to rusting corrosion related causes.
 
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